Line Tension

 

Fly casting instruction puts a lot of focus on tailing loops, its problems and cure, but almost none on “line dangle” or “dangling end”. I am not sure about the reason for this, as the dangle may be a source of problems on its own (losing heavy nymphs in the grass behind me comes immediately to mind). Maybe it is an issue that hasn’t been addressed specifically because it is considered as a tailing loop?

Anyway, the beauty of looking at a dangle in slo-mo is how it shows the distribution of tension along the fly line: tension is higher in the section of line closer to the rod tip and very low in the line end; so low in fact that it takes some time for that characteristic shape to be pulled out. Does it ring any bell about the tension in the line tip of a D or V loop?

15 comments on “Line Tension

  1. HC says:

    this video and the one on ‘wavy shapes’ are both excellent investigations into loops issues and their causes. thanks and keep them coming.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Mr. Smooothy says:

    Love your posts on wordpress, thank you and please keep them coming. regards Roy Wybrow MCI.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Mark Herron says:

    Wonder if you have you just made the case for “creep”?

    Cheers
    Mark

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  4. Mark Herron says:

    Apologies for the delay mate. As i understand it “creep” is supposedly the sin of going too soon which is punished by tailing loops. Penance is picking out the casting knots…..

    You rightly make the point that tension is unevenly distributed – higher near the tip, lower near the fly. If the dangle is a product of low tension, perhaps closely related to a belly of slack line, how does it get there? If low tension (line running out of net Force in the direction of the cast so the big G begins to prevail) is the problem then more tension might be the solution.

    The longer you wait before starting the next stroke, the less tension will be in the line. Hence, more tension and less dangle if we go a bit sooner than is traditionally approved.

    At short to medium range, tension and timing are less critical due to things like available stroke length and trajectory. Towards the limit of controlled distance they become more critical. At long range i regard some creep as close to essential – heresy perhaps but winter is nearly here and I like a fire to keep the toes warm. :^))

    Cheers
    Mark

    Liked by 1 person

    • Aitor says:

      Interesting approach. However, it isn’t low tension per se what produces a dangling end, but the rod tip rising up (viewed from the side) in relation to the line is what introduces that wave in the rod leg. I should check it with some slo mo but think that you can get a dangling end with a pretty straight rod leg as well.

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  5. Mark Herron says:

    I see you point and as ever it is a good one. The rod lifts and this creates a displacement. As I see the video above, the rod appears to be following the line down before you lift it as you move into the backcast. So I am guessing the line is falling as the rod is lifting. Only you really know what was going on with the line as it is out of frame. ie To what extent the line had finished turning over. It is hard to know what force other than gravity is pulling opposite to the stroke so as to create tension.

    Here’s a question though. What do you think the dangle would look like if the line or at least the leader was still turning over when you reversed the movement into the back cast? Same size and shape or different size and shape?

    Cheers
    Mark

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    • Aitor says:

      “What do you think the dangle would look like if the line or at least the leader was still turning over when you reversed the movement into the back cast? Same size and shape or different size and shape?”

      Difficult to know, as there are many variables at play. Here I am waiting for the loop to completely unroll, create a big line sag due to the trajectory of the forward cast… and no tail or line dangle is formed:

      In my view, whenever there is a long line with a significant sag there is the danger of a dangling end, whatever the line tension. The bigger the tension the faster the wave propagates, but line tension can’t avoid the wave formation in the first place.

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    • Aitor says:

      I don’t see how a rushed timing would make a difference in line sag here:

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      • Interesting footage mate. The amount of dangle does vary somewhat between forward casts. It also seems to be a bit different between back and forward casts and btw I notice the trajectory of the back casts is somewhat steeper than the forward casts.

        What do you put the dangle variations down to? And btw2 I’m not talking “rushed” timing but rather an earlier start on the longer carries.

        Cheers
        Mark

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      • Aitor says:

        What I mean is that I don’t see any significant difference in line sag if I started the forward cast earlier. Maybe you have some footage showing your point?

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  6. In the second vid the most of the line is still above the rod at the start of the forward cast. The wave appears to propagate fully and the upward trajectory appears to pull the line straight.

    At the beginning of 00.09 there is something like an inverse dangle. Rod is at RSP and loop has formed. Gravity working for you instead of against? Dunno. Agree about tension and propagation and line sag/slack.

    For me, minimising slack (maximising tension) allows effort to be reduced and I don’t wait for full turnover in either direction with a long carry. Interestingly, it reduces tails significantly. Don’t know about dangles but have my suspicions. :^))

    Cheers
    Mark

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  7. BTW wordpress is playing funny buggers with my log in now that I also have a wordpress site. Apologies for changing names and such. Still me.

    Cheers
    Mark

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