What? Delayed Rotation You Say?

We call casting stroke to the motion described by our arm and hand to propel our rod butt during the cast. In this way, we talk about back and forward casting strokes.
The casting stroke has two main characteristics:

  • It has to be an accelerated motion, that is, the speed of the rod butt should be increasing over time.
  • It is comprised of two different elements: translation and rotation.
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Nothing New Under the Sun II

Some of the many versions of australian aboriginal woomera

Stroke length and stroke angle —or translation and rotation, if you choose to be more technical— are two of the key elements of the casting stroke. Good technique asks for those two elements to be used in the proper sequence —that is, starting with translation only and applying rotation at the end of the stroke—, what has been called delayed rotation, although my mate Bernd Ziesche prefers to say:

“It is not delayed rotation, it is rotation at the right time.”

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