The Beauty of the Dolphin Nose

We call dolphin nose to a very characteristic shape taken by the fly leg of the loop. Its origin seems obscure to me, but Grunde Lovoll (fly caster and Ph.D. in Physics) says that it is the result of a decrease in tension in the fly leg of the loop during unrolling. Continue reading

Bloody L (bird’s-eye view)

Fishing on Gaula

Bloody L is the name that Simon Gawesworth gave to that line configuration in which the anchor of a Spey cast is at right angles with the rest of the fly leg of the D-Loop. It is a very inefficient anchor shape as it wastes energy from the delivery cast as the fly leg of the delivery loop tries to lift the anchor from the water; it may make the fly to fall short of its target.

Here is a bloody L in full glory, although it didn’t make that short cast fail. The dolphin nose is a nice one, though.

Piled Anchors

 

Those who follow my videos already know that I am very fond of bead chains. They provide an easy way of making interesting experiments and you can learn a lot by playing with them.

The experiment below is one of my favorites. It is about the implications of a piled anchor on a spey cast. The corollary? Two things: Continue reading

Anchor Loading the Rod?

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A fishing roll cast: look at the lack of tension in the fly leg of the D-loop

I was trying hard to follow exactly what I had been reading on all those books. The roll cast was an easy one —authors said— in fact easier than an overhead cast because you get rid of the backcast part. However, when practicing it my results were awful, to say the least.

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Sweep, Loading… Unloading II

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Nymphing on river Pliva

In the first article of this series we studied how the setting of a V-loop doesn’t put any load in the rod. The momentum of the line travelling backward is transferred to the water, without affecting the rod tip. In many spey casting technical works we find another purported source for that mythical rod pre-loading: the rod motion from the tilted sideways position at the end of the sweep into the more vertical position suitable for starting the forward cast, a maneouver also known as circling-up. A quote from the internet about this circling up and its consequences puts things in perspective:

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