Translation and Loop Control

In the past, translation used to be considered as a minor element inside the casting stroke; a stylistic choice. Fortunately, this view seems to be changing.
Failing to give translation the relevance it deserves looks weird to me, if only because being late rotation generally accepted as an important element in fly casting, the only thing you can do before starting rotation is translating, that is, you are never going to get late rotation without some translation first!

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Strange Loops

I have been regularly shooting slow motion videos of fly casting for the last ten years or so, and many of my filming sessions show some unexpected things that make me think and learn, and even change some of my previous views. Reality trumps fly casting models every time.

The following video is the result of one of last week’s filming session. At first sight, the appearance of two loops on the very same back cast was puzzling. Then I noticed how my leader was momentarily caught by the grass; how that short pull affected the rod tip; how, as a result, a small wave was formed in the line (a tiny tailing loop in fact) and how all those ingredients resulted in that weird loop configuration.

Did you notice that I love to study fly lines in slow motion? 😎


No tailing loop. Again

“… the classical pile cast where the upward trajectory on the last forward cast is very extreme, allowing for the line to fall to the surface in a pile. Be careful to avoid a tailing loop. You will need to back off on your force, open your loop, and angle your backcast down as much as possible.”

That above is a quote from a document I have been reading recently. Well, it is pretty easy to check the validity of that statement in practice.

Fourteen meters of line and leader from the reel to the fluff. No adjustments in force, narrow loop, back cast angled up… and still no tailing loop.

As usual, no tailing loop if you accelerate your casting stroke properly.


Link to more insights on the subject

Wavy Shapes and… Wavy Shapes

As a rule of thumb, any curvy shape in the fly leg of the loop is the telltale of some kind of casting problem. The most popular (or should I say unpopular?) of them being the tailing loop. But not all of those shapes are tailing loops. Another usual curvy shape is the dangling end; it is pretty recurrent in long casts —although, depending on the conditions, it can appear in short ones as well. Clarifying the difference between the two is not a trivial issue, as each one has a different origin and —more important— a different cure.

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The Beauty of the Dolphin Nose

We call dolphin nose to a very characteristic shape taken by the fly leg of the loop. Its origin seems obscure to me, but Grunde Lovoll (fly caster and Ph.D. in Physics) says that it is the result of a decrease in tension in the fly leg of the loop during unrolling. Continue reading