Stroke Angle

 

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Photo by Álvaro G. Santillán

 

As an enthusiastic reader and book lover I am not very fond of electronic books. Most probably it is a lost battle but I still enjoy the smell and feel of printed paper. The majority of my more than a hundred books on fly fishing are on paper, although, since electronic books have their advantages too, I started purchasing them as well time ago.

One of my latest adquisitions was Jason Borger’s Single Handed Fly Casting, which Jason himself kindly sent to me. Jason’s work is a refreshing new approach and a brilliant start to a change of paradigm in fly casting. Continue reading

Schematic Approach

 

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At the moment I am preparing a mentoring session for two anglers that are getting ready for two different casting certification tests. Writing is the best way I know of putting my ideas in order, so I have started this succinct list. A work in progress, probably. Comments are welcome. Continue reading

Loop Control Paradox (divertimento for curious casters)

Loop width control is a recurrent topic in casting instruction. Several aspects govern loop width, but “matching casting arc to rod bend” is what instructors use the most; so “if your loops are too wide narrow your casting arc” is the usual fix we offer. Continue reading

Mel’s Pulling Through Stroke

 

Mel's pulling through

Not so long ago endless debates about the pushing versus pulling casting “styles” were the norm. Currently it is a much rarely discussed subject, though it keeps appearing now and then. That issue always was the source of many doubts, the following is my take on a it.

Mel Krieger’s concept of a “pulling” stroke as opposed to a “pushing” one wasn’t intended as a way of telling apart two different casting styles, it was coined to describe any good casting stroke whatever the style used. For him the reference wasn’t the line but the rod: pulling the rod versus pushing it. In that regard, if you rotate the rod at the start of the casting stroke the rod is in front of your hand for the rest of the motion, so you are pushing it. Conversely, if you leave rotation for the end of the stroke the rod travels behind your hand, so you are pulling it. In summary, you should “pull through” when using an “elbow up-down” style, as much as when using an “elbow backward-forward” one. Continue reading