Amén

Chris preparado con la sacadera

Chris Dore es uno de los guías mejor considerados de Nueva Zelanda. He tenido la suerte de compartir con él varias jornadas de pesca, comprobando que esa fama es bien merecida. Ahora que por aquellos lares la temporada acaba de empezar, Chris acaba de publicar un corto texto orientativo para pescadores viajeros. Me ha dado permiso para traducirlo, así que aquí está.


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Style is Substance… Sometimes

Tim Rajeff during a masterclass in Germany

I perfectly understand why getting deep into casting mechanics is regarded as useless by a majority of fly fishers. But, that sound casting mechanics is equally rejected by such a big percentage of casting instructors is another matter entirely. Calling yourself a master and, at the same time, avoiding getting deep into the nuances of your trade seems rather weird to me.

On the other hand, some of us find casting mechanics not only fascinating, but —and this is key if you are an instructor— an indispensable tool to use in our teaching.

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Slack Line

A hungry backcountry brown

At last! A long and deep pool of gin clear water! After a very long, sweaty hike upstream, where the river looked much more suitable for whitewater sports than for fishing, this was a really relieving view. I started scanning the water in the tail slowly progressing upstream. Nothing. I was close to the head of the pool when I saw the fish: a big brown trout patrolling the slow water in the far bank, lazily taking bites from the full of debris surface

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Strange Loops

I have been regularly shooting slow motion videos of fly casting for the last ten years or so, and many of my filming sessions show some unexpected things that make me think and learn, and even change some of my previous views. Reality trumps fly casting models every time.

The following video is the result of one of last week’s filming session. At first sight, the appearance of two loops on the very same back cast was puzzling. Then I noticed how my leader was momentarily caught by the grass; how that short pull affected the rod tip; how, as a result, a small wave was formed in the line (a tiny tailing loop in fact) and how all those ingredients resulted in that weird loop configuration.

Did you notice that I love to study fly lines in slow motion? 😎