What distance should I be looking to achieve?

Long distance hook up. River Pliva

That above is a common question in fly fishing forums. So common that, in fact, it is the title of a thread I read recently. And the most usual reply to that question goes along these lines: “Most fish are taken within 35 feet.”

But, what happens when the fish are active 20+ meters away? Do you pack all gear and get back home?

In the occasion shown by the following video there were some nice brown trout rising in the middle of the river. By the way, if you share the popular view that you can’t hook fish on a dry fly at such a distance… well, just think twice. I caught quite a few browns that were rising just upstream of that bridge; the best one weighed 1 kg (McLean dixit), and a similar one came off the hook while I tried to prevent it to go downstream of the bridge, rubbing the line against one of the pillars.

It is always a pleasure to see my mate Prpa in action:

No tailing loop. Again

“… the classical pile cast where the upward trajectory on the last forward cast is very extreme, allowing for the line to fall to the surface in a pile. Be careful to avoid a tailing loop. You will need to back off on your force, open your loop, and angle your backcast down as much as possible.”

That above is a quote from a document I have been reading recently. Well, it is pretty easy to check the validity of that statement in practice.

Fourteen meters of line and leader from the reel to the fluff. No adjustments in force, narrow loop, back cast angled up… and still no tailing loop.

As usual, no tailing loop if you accelerate your casting stroke properly.

For some more insights:

https://onemorelastcast.net/2019/03/10/tailing-loops-and-the-180o-rule/

From Toes to Fingers

How much wrist should I use?

That above is a pretty common question in fly casting instruction. In my view it depends on your preferences. We tend to consider the wrist as the only joint providing the required rod butt rotation, but all joints act as a hinge so we actually rotate the rod with shoulder, elbow and wrist in varying degrees.

A good distance cast starts in the toes and finishes in the fingers.

Alejandro Viñuales

Our torso can translate back and forth, and even rotate around a vertical or horizontal axis. I think that the contribution of our trunk doesn’t get the credit it deserves as it can play an important role in fly casting. In fact, you can cast beautiful loops without using your arm joints at all.

This is a 12 m cast by means of just torso rotation. I am holding the rod with its butt firmly pressed against my belly and not using my shoulder/elbow/wrist at all. As you can see torso’s contribution is not negligible.