Single Handed Fly Casting (book review)

 

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Time flies. It was 15 years ago when I bought my copy of Jason Borger’s first book, Nature of Fly Casting, at the Denver’s Fly Fishing Retailer Show. I even had the pleasure of getting it signed by Jason himself.

It was at that time that I started thinking of becoming a proficient fly caster, and in that regard that book has been my favorite reference for years —as its abundant underlined paragraphs, result of many reads, can testify.

At some point, Jason felt the need of updating its work; and rightly so, as the arrival of the internet and its ability to encourage the fast exchange of ideas completely changed our understanding of casting in the latest years. As Jason himself explained, as the work progressed he felt that a completely new book was in order. So now we have available this brand new Single Handed Fly Casting.

As a casting geek I can say that I am totally satisfied with the casting mechanics that underlies the book; in fact I think that NFC was heavier in that department, so take the expression “underlies” as a carefully chosen word, for, this time, Jason doesn’t get into the intricacies of casting physics, focusing exclusively on practical casting issues, and addressing them in-depth. So both poets and engineers will be equally pleased: the former won’t have to deal with any physics or formulas; the latter will find simple explanations that don’t violate physics laws —the lack of use of the usual catch-all expression “rod load”, which in fact is never mentioned throughout he book, is a pleasant example.

If you are an angler serious about your casting you will find lots of inspiration on this book; if you are a casting instructor it is a must-have.

Jason’s drawings are well known by their quality. In this case they are based in actual photographs of the techniques depicted, which is a truly original departure from the idealized scenario usually found in fly casting illustrations. The rod and line configurations showed not only match reality, that reality is conveyed more clearly than in photographs, for a drawing allows for putting the accent in the most important aspects leaving the distracting ones aside.

When, months ago, I received a message from Jason asking about the possibility of some kind of proof-reading prior to publication it was a totally unexpected honor.

Thank you, Maestro!

2 comments on “Single Handed Fly Casting (book review)

  1. […] “If you are an angler serious about your casting you will find lots of inspiration on this book; if you are a casting instructor it is a must-have.” – Aitor Coteron, One More Last Cast […]

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