Boring? Are you kidding?

It happened again yesterday. While having a wine with some friends it was mentioned that I like fishing, and even travel far away to practice it.

—Fishing? —said somebody—. It is so boring!

When people hear the word “fishing” what invariably comes to their mind is some guy sitting at the sea shore, listening to some football match in the radio while waiting for hours for any sign of life in the rod planted in front of him.

Trying to explain that the fly fishing approach is exactly the opposite is normally a waste of time. However, I remembered a couple of clips I shot in New Zealand recently and decided to edit them and keep the video in my phone. Will it succeed in showing all those laypersons that in fly fishing there is no time to get bored? Great job by outstanding fisher Álvaro G. Santillán.

No tailing loop. Again

“… the classical pile cast where the upward trajectory on the last forward cast is very extreme, allowing for the line to fall to the surface in a pile. Be careful to avoid a tailing loop. You will need to back off on your force, open your loop, and angle your backcast down as much as possible.”

That above is a quote from a document I have been reading recently. Well, it is pretty easy to check the validity of that statement in practice.

Fourteen meters of line and leader from the reel to the fluff. No adjustments in force, narrow loop, back cast angled up… and still no tailing loop.

As usual, no tailing loop if you accelerate your casting stroke properly.

For some more insights:

https://onemorelastcast.net/2019/03/10/tailing-loops-and-the-180o-rule/

From Toes to Fingers

How much wrist should I use?

That above is a pretty common question in fly casting instruction. In my view it depends on your preferences. We tend to consider the wrist as the only joint providing the required rod butt rotation, but all joints act as a hinge so we actually rotate the rod with shoulder, elbow and wrist in varying degrees.

A good distance cast starts in the toes and finishes in the fingers.

Alejandro Viñuales

Our torso can translate back and forth, and even rotate around a vertical or horizontal axis. I think that the contribution of our trunk doesn’t get the credit it deserves as it can play an important role in fly casting. In fact, you can cast beautiful loops without using your arm joints at all.

This is a 12 m cast by means of just torso rotation. I am holding the rod with its butt firmly pressed against my belly and not using my shoulder/elbow/wrist at all. As you can see torso’s contribution is not negligible.